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Peter Ryan
4789 Route 309
Center Valley  PA 18034
 Phone: 610-791-4400 1958
Office Phone: 610-791-4400
Cell: 610-360-0820
Fax: 267-354-6890 
peterryan01@gmail.com
Peter Ryan

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Moving Out of State? 3 Estate-Planning Consequences to Consider

September 10, 2014 2:36 am

Moving to another state can be a stressful process. The last thing you want is to add the headache of estate law problems to your growing list of worries. But America is constantly moving. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that almost 36 million U.S. residents moved between 2012 and 2013.

Give yourself a moment, put down the boxes, and read about three estate consequences of an out-of-state move that you may not have considered:

1. State Rules about Out-of-State Executors

With your family and your old life back in your old state, it's pretty likely that your estate executors are out-of-state executors, which might be a problem.

Some states, like Ohio, require that out-of-state executors be related by blood or marriage to the estate holder, or at least reside in a state where non-relations can be named as executors. Your chosen executor may also need to travel to the state where you have died in order to administer your estate, so it may be necessary to keep travel ability in mind.

Other states, like New York, may also make it difficult for an out-of-state executor to take your property back to his or her home state. Before you move, you'll want to check the executor rules in both your current and future home states (or ask an estate planning attorney).

2. Moving Into (or Out of) a Community Property State


Some of the most populous states in the country are community property states, and whether you're moving into one or moving away from one, you need to consider the effect on your estate plan. A married couple who moves from Texas to New York may be unaware of how much the difference in inheritance and marital property laws will affect the final distribution of property.

This can be even further complicated if the married couple is same-sex and moving to a state which does not recognize the union as legal.

3. Different Rules About Living Wills/Advance Medical Directives

Living wills, also known as advance medical directives or advance health directives, are creatures of state law. Why risk having your wishes relating to life support hang on a technicality between state laws? For example, if you're a woman, you may wish to know if your new state will allow life support to be removed in the event you are pregnant.

An experienced estate planning attorney in either your old or new state should be able to clear up these and other estate consequences of moving to another state.

Source: FindLaw.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Turn a New Leaf with a Fall Family Road Trip

September 10, 2014 2:36 am

(BPT) - With the cooler temperatures of autumn flowing in, many Americans will be hitting the road to discover the natural beauty that the season brings. Whether they crave adventure, want to see the fall foliage or are just getting ready for the Thanksgiving holiday, families need to be prepared to ensure they are getting the most out of this travel season.

"When it comes to fall travel, there is no experience quite like the autumn day drive - it's your last taste of crisp air and warm colors before the blanket of winter hibernation sets in," says Editor in Chief of "Road & Travel Magazine," Courtney Caldwell. "The keys to a successful road trip lay within the amount of preparation you do for your family and vehicle before you put either into motion."

Nothing puts a damper on a weekend getaway like car issues that could have easily been prevented by simple maintenance.

The American Petroleum Institute's (API) Motor Oil Matters (MOM) program has been established to provide information to consumers on the importance of using high quality motor oils, and verifying the oils are properly identified on invoices and receipts. Oil-change locations and motor oil distributors that share MOM's commitment - and submit to independent, third-party auditing - have the opportunity to be recognized by MOM through the Motor Oil Matters distributor and installer licensing programs.

MOM and Caldwell recommend fall travelers arm themselves with a simple plan of action and preparation to help get to their destination:

Don't fall behind on your vehicle maintenance


Change that oil: Motor oil is the lifeblood of your engine. One of the simplest steps you can take to ensure your vehicle is maintained is to change your motor oil with an API-licensed motor oil that meets your vehicle manufacturer's recommendations. Be wary of deals that sound too good to be true, and make sure your value-priced oil change includes high quality motor oil. MOM has put together a checklist for consumers, to ensure they are confident when going into a shop. To download this checklist, please visit www.motoroilmatters.org.

Breathe free
: Replacing a dirty air filter can increase a vehicle's life expectancy and fuel efficiency by reducing the strain on the engine, especially during warmer months.

Check your tires: Pay attention to your tire pressure and tread depth, as they are essential for increased automotive safety and optimum driving performance. The lower the tread depth is on your tires, the less traction you will have on wet and dry roads, and the greater the distance you will need to stop.

Enjoy more than the season

Keeping everyone happy: Write out a packing list for each family member. Store these lists on your computer so you can adjust them for different seasons and trips. Kids can be easily entertained during long car rides in the backseat with trivia, coloring books, games, books, assorted toys and stuffed animals.

Stop and pop: Bathroom breaks are always a good thing. They force you to get out of the car and talk with locals. A 10-minute break every two hours also increases alertness and adds to the overall sight-seeing experience.

Expect the unexpected
: Always have a car-safety kit packed for you and your family. It should contain: an auto escape tool, blankets, cell phone charger, cleaning items, flashlight, jumper cables, matches, pencil and notepad, warning lights or road flares, bottled water, non-perishable items and drinks, extra (hidden) cash, and a well-equipped first aid kit.

Keep it clean: Save and bring a handful of plastic grocery bags in the car to use for trash, damp clothes, or a "sick" bag for any car-sick passengers.

Source: www.roadandtravel.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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3 Simple Things You Can Do Today to Feel Better Tomorrow

September 10, 2014 2:36 am

“Imagine you’re a spider with just one leg,” says Dr. Frank King.

“You put forth immense effort to try to haul yourself around and not only does it wear you out, it’s frustrating and you don’t get far.” King is a chiropractor and doctor of naturopathy specializing in homeopathic remedies, and author of The Healing Revolution (www.kingbio.com).

“It gets a bit easier with two legs and easier still with four legs. But it’s not till you have all eight legs that you can really dance.”

Dr. King explains that the eight legs represent Eight Essentials we need for optimum mental, physical and spiritual health: Empowering your human spirit; Water; Nutrition; Fitness; Sleep; Nature; Relationships; and Hands On Techniques (touch).

“It would be overwhelming and self-defeating to look at all eight areas and think, ‘I have to make significant changes in every area immediately!” Dr. King says. “You don’t have to and who could? I know from my experience with countless patients and friends, and even in my own life, that you can see immediate results by making a few small changes at a time.”

Dr. King describes three that are easy to make and will have you feeling better quickly.

Drink half your body weight in ounces of spring or well water every day. If you weigh 150 pounds, that’s 75 ounces of water (about 9 cups).

“Many of us walk around dehydrated without realizing it and that can have a significant effect on our health and how we feel,” Dr. King says. Dehydrated bodies trap toxins and encourage water retention – a natural defense against the chronic “drought.”

“Our bodies need the steady flow of pure, spring or well water. If you don’t like the taste, try mixing up to a teaspoon of sea salt into a quart of water,” he says.

A simple test for dehydration: Pinch the skin on the back of your hand and hold for three seconds. When you release, if the ridge from the pinch remains for more than a second, you’re probably dehydrated.

Take at least a few minutes every day to connect with nature. Nature brings perpetual revitalization and ongoing renewal, especially when experienced through multiple senses: the smell of freshly turned earth or evergreens in the woods; the touch of cool stream water on your face or feet; the sight of birds on the wing and budding blooms.

“These are not just pleasant little gifts to experience—we need them for restoration, renewal, revival and rehabilitation,” Dr. King says. “The more disconnected we become from the Earth, the more we inhibit our body’s natural ability to heal.”

Take a brisk, 10- to 20-minute walk every day. Walking is the simplest, most natural form of exercise. You might walk a nature trail, walk to the store instead of driving or take your pet for a stroll.

“Three brisk 10-minute walks a day are as effective at lowering blood pressure as one 30-minute walk,” Dr. King says, citing an Arizona State University study.

“Outdoor walking is preferable to walking on a treadmill or other machine, since the uneven surfaces and changing directions of natural walking will engage more muscles and tendons.”

Swing each arm in synchronization with the opposite foot to strengthen your cross-crawl functionality and mind-body balance.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Get More Out of Household Items with Double-Duty Tips

September 9, 2014 2:00 am

From removing stains to shining shoes, you can do more than think with common household items. Here are a dozen ideas from Good Housekeeping Magazine just to get you started:
  • Mayo for water rings – Water rings on the table? Dab on mayonnaise (not the lite kind), let sit for a few hours and wipe away the mayo and the water ring.
  • Eyeglass case – When packing for your next vacation, use a spare eyeglass case for safely stowing jewelry, ear buds, chargers or other small items.
  • Kitchen tongs – Use them to help you grab something from a high closet shelf or something that fell behind the washer or dryer.
  • Liquid laundry pre-treater – Use it to loosen labels on washable hard surfaces or that annoying adhesive left by price stickers.
  • Emery boards – Use them to gently buff away stains on your suede handbags or shoes.
  • Table spoon – After chopping onions or garlic, neutralize your smelly hands by rubbing them on a stainless steel spoon under running water.
  • Kneadable art eraser – It does a fine job of removing scuffmarks from tile or wooden floors.
  • Drinking straws – Making a bouquet or floral centerpiece? Firm up the stems of tulips, daffodils and other flowers by inserting each stem into a drinking straw before adding it to a vase or bowl. Cut straws to size if you need to.
  • Newspaper – Spiff up dark colored shoes in a pinch by rubbing them with a balled-up sheet of black and white newspaper. (No polish needed.)
  • Cooking spray – Spritz a little on a squeaky door hinge, then swing the door back and forth a few times until the squeaking stops.
  • Rubber gloves – Grab one from under the sink and use to help you open a tight or stuck jar lid.
  • Kitchen colander – The old pasta drainer provides a wring-proof way to get the water out of hand-washed delicates. Push the water out, let drip for a bit and lay flat to dry.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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First Aid Basics Every Kid Should Know

September 9, 2014 2:00 am

Kids love summer. They have more time for fun with friends and, in many cases, more freedom to explore their surroundings without adult supervision. But accidents happen, and kids old enough to play outdoors should know some first aid basics.

Before your children run out into the great summer outdoors, consider arming them with a cell phone so they can call home or 911 in an emergency - and be sure they are familiar with these first aid tips for common childhood injuries:

Nosebleed – Have the person sit up straight and lean forward slightly. (Don’t tilt the head backward.) With thumb and index finger, firmly pinch the nose just below the bone up against the face. Apply pressure for five minutes. If bleeding continues, repeat the process.

Bee or wasp sting – If the person has a history of severe reaction to stings – or if they have trouble breathing, feel faint or dizzy, or have a swollen tongue – call 911 immediately. Otherwise, scrape the area with a fingernail and try to remove the stinger. Elevate the affected arm or leg and apply something cold if available. Unless the pain, dizziness or other symptoms dramatically lessen, get the person home as soon as possible.

Sprain – It may not be easy to know at once if the injury is a sprain or a broken bone. Have the injured person rest for a few minutes, apply ice if available, then compress the injury by wrapping the arm or leg not too tightly in a towel or a rolled up shirt. If the person can walk or limp, take him or her home. If not, call parents or 911. The injury should be seen by a doctor as soon as possible to determine if there is a break.

Severe sunburn – If the burned skin begins to blister, it’s a sign of serious sunburn. Rehydrate the victim with water, juice or sports drink. Soothe the burn by bathing with lukewarm water or applying cool compresses. Apply aloe or moisturizing lotion, keep the person out of the sun, and get him or her home to rest.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Run Your Home More Like a CEO

September 9, 2014 2:00 am

All successful CEOs have one thing in common: They’re able to maintain a big-picture perspective. It’s also something successful moms have in common, says Zenovia Andrews, a business strategist, speaker, author and mom who coaches entrepreneurs and CEOs on time and budget management.

“In business, CEOs implement a process that achieves efficient time and resource management in the most cost-effective way; sounds a lot like a mom, doesn’t it?” says Andrews, founder and CEO of The MaxOut Group, a company devoted to empowering and teaching entrepreneurs development strategies to increase profits.

“If every mom were a CEO, America would rule the world!”

Andrews, author of the new book “All Systems Go – A Solid Blueprint to Build Business and Maximize Cash Flow,” (www.zenoviaandrews.com), suggests the following tips for moms to better manage money and time.

CEOs utilize apps, and so should CEO Moms. When a CEO’s personal assistant isn’t around or, if it’s a small business and she doesn’t have one, then apps do nicely. There are several apps for moms, including Bank of Mom – an easy way to keep track of your kids' allowances. Set up an account for each child and track any money they earn for chores or allowance. The app also allows you to track their computer and TV time as well as other activities.

Measurement is the key to knowledge, control and improvement. CEOs have goals for their businesses and Moms have goals for their family members. In either case, the best way to achieve a big-picture goal is to identify action steps and objectives and a system for measuring progress. Want to improve your kids’ test scores, help your husband lose weight or – gasp – free some time for yourself? There are four phases to help track progress: planning, or establishing goals; collection, or conducting research on your current process; analysis – comparing information from existing processes with the new one; and adapting, or implementing the new process.

Understand your home’s “workforce.” A good CEO helps her employees grow and develop, not only for the company’s benefit, but for the employee’s as well. Most people are happiest when they feel they’re learning and growing, working toward a goal, which may be promotion within the company or something beyond it. When they feel the CEO is helping with that, they’re happier, more productive, more loyal employees. Likewise, CEO Moms need to help their children gain the skills and knowledge they need not only to succeed in general but to achieve their individual dreams.

A well-running household is a community effort; consider “automated” systems. In business, automated systems tend to be as clinical as they sound, typically involving technology. Yet, there’s also a human resource element. Automated systems are a must for CEO Moms, and they tend to take the form of scheduling at home. Whose night is it for the dishes, or trash? One child may be helpful in the kitchen, whereas another may be better at cleaning the pool.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Majority of Americans in the Driver's Seat When Buying a Vehicle

September 8, 2014 1:24 am

The majority of Americans demand explicit control during the car shopping process, opting to use independent automotive research sites and experience-based activities, such as visiting a dealership and talking with friends, rather than traditional advertising channels, to navigate the process of buying a car. According to a recent study by C+R Research, car shoppers rely only on a handful of trustworthy resources when researching and purchasing a vehicle.

"Consumers can be overwhelmed by automotive content, but rather than tune it all out, they're selecting the pieces that are most valuable to them, effectively curating their own car buying experience," said Simon Tiffen, senior manager of advertiser insights at Cars.com. "They're willing to put the time in to gather all the information they need so that they're confident when they eventually head to the dealership."

From TV and radio advertisements to independent research sites and offline conversations, consumers are inundated with auto-related messages throughout the car shopping process; however, the majority of consumers report using only one or two sources to make a decision. These "go-to" sources are typically viewed as the most helpful and trustworthy by consumers.

Additionally, offline experiences, not offline advertisements, impact consumers. The most influential offline information sources are experience-based and include talking to friends, visiting a dealership and noticing a vehicle on the street.

More importantly, online research has become a substitute for dealership contact. Only half of all car shoppers reported contacting a dealership prior to visiting, with most citing that they felt it was unnecessary given the information available online.

Knowing when to leverage each source is equally important. The study found that online sources are more influential earlier in the shopping process, while offline sources, such as visiting a dealership, become more important once primary online research has been conducted.

Source: Cars.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Few Homebuyers Familiar with Affordable Loan Programs

September 8, 2014 1:24 am

A recent TD bank survey reveals that just one in five homebuyers are familiar with affordable loan programs. Findings from the survey fuel growing concerns among real estate professionals that lenders are not providing enough information to borrowers about the programs. Of the 150 real estate professionals surveyed, 70 percent expressed a desire for lenders to make affordable loans, such as FHA and VA loans, easier to access.

According to the survey, only 20 percent of homebuyers are even aware that such programs exist. Real estate professionals reported that 64 percent of buyers consulted them for guidance during the lending process, spending an average of 2.5 hours discussing loan options. Nearly 80 percent recommended a lender.

The survey also concludes:
  • More than half of the real estate professionals surveyed believe buyers are compromising their wants in order to buy a home quickly.
  • Real estate professionals consider a number of factors when recommending a lender – the most important of which is closing time. Other factors include understanding of buyer needs, non-commitment to pre-approval rates, and not overpromising.
  • Eighty percent of real estate professionals believe mortgage-focused banks are easier to work with.
With 40 percent of real estate professionals believing it is now more difficult than ever to secure a loan, it is crucial for homebuyers, especially first-timers, to educate themselves through the help of a professional. For more about affordable loan programs, visit makinghomeaffordable.gov.

Source: Real Trends

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Prepare for an Emergency in Four Simple Steps

September 8, 2014 1:24 am

(Family Features) Preparing for an unexpected emergency, especially one brought on by severe weather, is one of the most important ways you can protect your home and family. Proactively addressing storm-related issues ranging from property damage to power outages can minimize a potentially disastrous situation.

Step 1: Verify Your Homeowners Insurance Covers Storm Damage

Nearly all homeowners carry some form of insurance on their home, as required by their mortgage lender. But policies can vary, and the aftermath of a powerful storm is no time to find out you’re underinsured.

To ensure your homeowners policy adequately covers your needs, take time to review the policy every year at renewal time, and any time you make any significant improvements to your home. Check that the coverage amount for your main residence accurately reflects the finished square footage of your home, including any upgrades or changes. Confirm that the replacement cost your homeowners insurance agent has determined is consistent with what you would expect to pay to rebuild your home.

In addition, take time to understand any exclusions, especially those for weather-related incidents. For example, many homeowners insurance policies do not automatically include flood protection.

Finally, take time to thoroughly document your personal possessions with video or still images and record their value. Store the documentation in a safe place, such as a safety deposit box or remote-access electronic file, that you will be able to access in the event of an emergency. Not only will this help expedite your claim if you need to replace items, but you’ll have a list ready when you face the daunting task of replacing your belongings.

Step 2: Keep Up With Home Maintenance

Stepping outside after a significant storm is no time to remember that you forgot to trim a tree or secure a loose section of fencing. Making time to provide ongoing home maintenance for exterior features of your home, such as landscaping, decking, siding, roofing and shutters, will ensure they are in good condition when bad weather strikes.

While little can be done to prevent damage from high-impact storms, routinely checking that everything is in good repair will minimize the chances of preventable destruction.

As you assess your home and yard, ask yourself: Are the trees and shrubs properly trimmed and set far enough away from structures that they are unlikely to topple in high winds? Are shutters affixed securely to the house? Are there any cracked or otherwise weakened windows that should be replaced to prevent shattering during a storm?

Step 3: Prepare for Backup Power during an Outage

Loss of power is one of the most common occurrences in severe weather. And the financial impact of outage-related expenses (e.g. spoiled food replacement, supply purchases or home repair) can add up quickly.

The easiest way to prepare for a weather-related power outage is by installing a standby generator in advance of the storm season. Fortunately, attaining the safety and comfort provided by a standby generator during a storm event has become more reasonable thanks to emerging technology that has made generators smaller, smarter and more affordable.

4. Have an Emergency Preparedness Kit

Having an emergency preparedness kit of items that your household may need in an emergency situation is critical. Basic utilities such as electricity, gas, water, sewage and phone service may be unavailable after a storm strikes, so the kit should contain food, water, any necessary medications, lighting and backup battery supplies.

Source: GE Generator Systems

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Mortgage Rates Hold Steady

September 5, 2014 1:39 am

Freddie Mac released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing average fixed mortgage rates largely steady for the third straight week.

"Mortgage rates were little changed amid a week of light economic reports. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rate remained unchanged from the previous week at 4.10 percent,” notes Frank Nothaft, vice president and chief economist, Freddie Mac. “Of the few releases, the ISM's manufacturing index rose to 59.0 in August from 57.1 the previous month. This was the highest reading of the index since March 2011.”

30-year-fixed-rate mortgages (FRM) averaged 4.10 percent with an average of 0.5 point for the week ending September 4, 2014, unchanged from last week. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 4.57 percent.

15-year FRMs this week averaged 3.24 percent with an average 0.5 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.25 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 3.59 percent.

5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.97 percent this week with an average 0.5 point, unchanged from last week. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 3.28 percent.

1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.40 percent this week with an average 0.4 point, up from last week when it averaged 2.39 percent. At this time last year, the 1-year ARM averaged 2.71 percent.

Source: Freddie Mac

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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